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When we are looking to optimize the performance of  web applications we should keep in mind about Memory Load, Processor Load and Network Bandwidth. Here are 50  best practices to improve the performance and scalability of ASP.NET applications.

 
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Minimize HTTP Requests

80% of the end-user response time is spent on the front-end. Most of this time is tied up in downloading all the components in the page: images, stylesheets, scripts, Flash, etc. Reducing the number of components in turn reduces the number of HTTP requests required to render the page. This is the key to faster pages.

One way to reduce the number of components in the page is to simplify the page's design. But is there a way to build pages with richer content while also achieving fast response times? Here are some techniques for reducing the number of HTTP requests, while still supporting rich page designs.

 
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The following list includes the HTML codes for the ASCII symbols used on Web pages. The first section includes the first 255 character codes and their related HTML codes. Then, at the bottom you'll find some other symbols that don't have ASCII designations and the HTML codes to create them. Not all browsers support all the codes, so be sure to test your HTML codes before you use them.

 

The <meta> tag is a header tag that is meant to do one of two things:

  1. provide supporting documentation about the Web page
  2. interact with the Web server

Most people are familiar with using meta tags to provide additional information about their pages to search engines. When used in this fashion, the meta tag provides name/value pairs that describe the Web page. It is then up to the search engine or other CGI or script to interpret them.

 

Performance tuning is not easy and there aren’t any silver bullets, but you can go a surprisingly long way with a few basic guidelines.

In theory, performance tuning is done by a DBA. But in practice, the DBA is not going to have time to scrutinize every change made to a stored procedure. Learning to do basic tuning might save you from reworking code late in the game.

 
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